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Diving with… Maldivers Diving Centre, Maalhos, Baa Atoll, Maldives

Maldives DTA Team

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In this ongoing series, we speak to the people who run dive centres, resorts and liveaboards from around the world about their businesses and the diving they have to offer…


What is your name?

Adam Abdul Raheem but people call me Dhaanu.

What is the name of your business?

Maldivers Diving Centre.

What is your role within the business?

Dive Centre Manager and a Director of the company.

How long has the business operated for?

Maldivers has been operating since 1999 but we moved to Maalhos in 2017.

How long have you dived for, and what qualification are you?

Diving for over 14 years. Currently an SSI Divemaster Instructor.

What is your favorite type of diving?

I enjoy all types of diving. I like to take my time while diving and find different sorts of animals, and learn about them.

If you could tell people one thing about your business (or maybe more!) to make them want to visit you what would it be?

Dive local! We are a dive centre on a local island in the Maldives. You get to experience the actual Maldives. We are passionate about sharing the underwater world with all those who come our way.

What is your favorite dive in your location and why?

Dhonfan Thila in Baa Atoll. It is a small pinnacle and the marine life there is quite diverse. You can see both types of turtles, Sharks, Rays and the coral life is nice as well.

What types of diving are available in your location?

We have dives suitable for divers with all experience levels. There are reefs which are suitable for more novice divers or for those who like to do relaxed dives, and pinnacle dives which are for more experienced divers. No matter what type of diving, the marine life is great and there are interesting things to see. Manta Rays can be seen regularly from April to November. Sharks can be seen even at our island’s house reef.

What do you find most rewarding about your current role?

I’ve worked as a divemaster and dive instructor for several different companies. I am able to use what I’ve learnt in operating Maldivers. I get to see everything first hand and apply a personal touch. We aim to run the place exactly how we want a dive centre to operate: safety conscious and oriented towards meeting the wishes of our divers.

What is your favorite underwater creature?

The Manta Ray. I could spend all day just observing them swimming around. But I do love and appreciate all marine life. I try to go out every day to the sea even if there are no divers or snorkelers going out with us.

Are there any exciting changes / developments coming up in the near future?

The community at Maalhos is working to become more environmentally friendly. Several key steps have been taken in doing so such as reducing the amount of single-use plastic that is on the island by operating a water plant that gives out water in reusable glass bottles and reducing household waste. Maalhos recently got an award for being the Leading Eco Island in the Maldives.

We plan to run dive courses specially catered for those who want to get into diving as a career. We would like to provide them with all the support needed to do so to come over to Maalhos and train with us.

As a center what is the biggest problem you face at the moment?

Climate change is the biggest problem. The underwater world is changing so fast due to this. Some people expect all the reefs to be pristine and full of coral. But this is not the case. Some reefs in the Maldives are in bad condition due to coral bleaching. This being said, there are quite a few reefs which are healthy and in good condition. It is great that the atoll we are located in is a Biosphere Reserve and there is a degree of protection for the reefs here from different other stressors. Luckily fish life and other marine life is quite good.

Is your center involved in any environmental work?

Quite a few. We do beach and underwater clean-ups quite regularly. Sometimes every day. Whenever we go out on the beach we take a bag to collect any trash that washes up. Our divers and the locals like to join the clean-ups as well.

We do regular monitoring of Maalhos House Reef to check the health of the reef and the different fauna on the reef as well as do coastal monitoring to learn how the beach of the island moves with the changing seasons. The information we collect goes to a national database to become part of a larger pool of similar data that comes from all over the Maldives.

We are looking for more ways to be involved and to give back.

How do you see the SCUBA / Freediving / snorkeling industry overall? What changes would you make?

Divers, snorkelers and free divers see and understand all the changes that happen to the underwater world and we are happy that quite a few of them are strong advocates for conservation.

We would like to see more people (who do not dive or snorkel) go out and witness the underwater beauty so they would understand the importance of protecting and preserving what little is left of our natural world.

What would you say to our visitors to promote the diving you have to offer?

We aim to ensure all who visit our island home have a good time. We like to offer a personalised service to each person. All of our dives and snorkelling trips are done in small groups so that everyone can enjoy and we welcome people with all different experience and comfort levels to go out with us.

Where can our visitors find out more about your business? 

News

Euro-Divers opens to guests at Alila Kothaifaru Maldives

Maldives DTA Team

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In celebration of Euro-Divers’ 50 Years of Diving with Friends in the Maldives, the team have opened a new PADI 5 Star Dive Center at Alila Kothaifaru Maldives.

Alila Kothaifaru Maldives retreat lies at the northern edge of the Maldives in the tranquil Raa Atoll, reached via a panoramic 45-minute seaplane voyage from Male. The island has 80 all-pool-villas, 36 of which are over water with a private pool for your enjoyment and 44 beachfront villas designed seamlessly to immerse guests in the natural surroundings. In support of sustainable tourism, Alila hotels adopt Earth Check operating standards, integrating their environments’ natural, physical, and cultural elements.

Raa Atoll is well-known for the excellent scuba diving it offers. The underwater landscape of Raa Atoll is characterized by a high number of thilas scattered inside the lagoons. These underwater coral mountains are magnets for marine life including huge schools of tropical reef fish, a generous splash of colour, iconic bucket-list-must-see marine creatures including sharks, mantas (appearing during the entire year), turtles, and uncrowded dive sites—a perfect diver’s heaven for beginners and experienced divers. We offer a full range of PADI courses for different levels. From November till March, the Manta cleaning station is located 15 minutes away by boat.

The team from Alila Kothaifaru Maldives look forward to welcoming you soon. 

Find out more at: www.euro-divers.com/alila-kothaifaru-maldives

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Scuba Bucket List Maldives Vlog – Fuvamulah: Island of Sharks

Scuba Bucket List

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First in a three part vlog from Jake Davies (JDScuba) & Giovana Braia on their recent trip to the Maldives…

With countries opening their borders after almost two years of lockdown it was time to head to a destination which we had high on our list for a few years which was the Maldives. Whilst planning the trip we wanted to make sure we got to experience the Maldives, from its local islands to one of the many resorts that can be found around the archipelago. Whilst also ticking off the many shark and ray species that can be seen. 

There was one island in particular that we wanted to visit, an island that’s become more and more popular over the last couple of years and that is the incredible island of Fuvamlulah. However, it wasn’t long after arriving into the Maldives that we realised that the bag that had the underwater housing and some dive kit hadn’t got on the flight in Dubai. Not the start we had expected but we weren’t going to let this ruin the incredible trip that we had planned. 

Situated in the deep south of the archipelago, skipping over the equator is Fuvamulah Island,  an hour and a half flight from Male airport. The island offers one of the most unique shark encounters in the Maldives: diving with Tiger Sharks. The number of Tiger Sharks found around Fuvamulah has made the island an ever increasing important area for these sharks. Around the island the water drops off to hundreds of meters, where the water can upwell from the depths bringing cold nutrient rich water to the surface. This provides for even more exciting encounters that can occur within the blue and around the plateau cleaning station with species such as Thresher Sharks, Great and Scalloped Hammerheads, Oceanic Mantas and Whale Sharks. Tiger Sharks are guaranteed at the island, whether they are seen out in the blue or at the famous ‘Tiger Zoo’ which is located at the mouth of the harbour. 

We booked our diving and accommodation with Fuvamulah Dive School, as part of the ‘one day look‘ package. As part of the package, they organise the flights, transportation whilst on the island and a place to stay at the Fuvamulah Inn which is only a 5 min journey to the dive centre situated at the island’s harbour. 

We had two days diving booked where there were three dives a day which included a dive at ‘Tiger Zoo’ each day. This dive was planned for the end of the day as the  sharks follow the fishers out when they head out in the morning and then follow them back where they then stay around for the offcuts. 

Heading out on the first day of diving we went out to the plateau to take a look at the cleaning station in case any Threshers were around as well as the possibility of some pelagics. Jumping into the 29 degree water was definitely a change from the colder waters off the Welsh coast and the visibility was incredible. We headed down, taking the time to keep an eye out for any shadows in the blue, before reaching the plateau. A few small White-tip Reef Sharks were seen patrolling the ledges along with a large female Tiger Shark cruising below in the depths. After 40mins and no sign of Threshers it was time to head back, where the 6m safety stop was accompanied by another large female Tiger but sadly no pelagics. 

Following a surface interval we then headed to the next site, just a short steam out of the harbour to where the beach drops off to depth creating an almost wall-like dive. The dive provided plenty of coral including some huge fan coral at the deeper depths. The large amount of coral also provides for some encounters with Hawksbill Turtles. 

For the last dive of the day we went to the famous Tiger Zoo. Swimming over to the shallow ledge, we set up in a line whilst the dive school divers hid fish offcuts around the site to bring in the Tiger Sharks. In position, holding on as there was a swell running, we saw a glimpse of the the first Tiger Shark emerging from the distance. The Tigers found in the area are mainly large female sharks, growing over 4m in length and in some cases over 5m. As they came close it was incredible to look at these amazing Apex predators in their eyes and how graceful they glide past. In total, five sharks appeared, providing some close up encounters. During the second day and another visit at Tiger Zoo, a total of seven sharks were encountered, all providing the same close up curious experience. During the the dives the Fuvamulah Dive school team were incredibly professional and ensured that the dives were carried out in a safe and enjoyable manner. 

Surfacing after Tiger Zoo saw the end of the two days diving at Fuvamulah – two incredible and unforgettable days of diving where encounters in the blue alongside those at Tiger Zoo will never be forgotten. It’s a diving location that’s definitely recommended but also a spot that should be continuously monitored to better understand the population of the many species that are found around the island. Fuvamulah surely is the ‘Island of Sharks’. 

A 2am start beckoned for the beginning of our next journey, a flight back north to Male airport to then head to Dhigurah for a few days to explore another local island, this time on the lookout for Whale Sharks. Whilst also continuing to hope that our missing suitcase would finally arrive with us.


Watch more videos and subscribe to Scuba Bucket List on YouTube.

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